The institute of Osteopathy

A new role for Glynis with the institute of Osteopathy

Glynis is applying for a role on the council of the institute of Osteopathy. Many of you have expressed your encouragement for her looking for new roles in osteopathy. We thought that you might like to see the statement I made to support my application. https://www.iosteopathy.org/


Statement 

I am an advocate of osteopathic care and work hard to support my local and wider osteopathic community, regularly speaking with local stakeholders and community groups to promote osteopathy. I have been a member of the Scottish Osteopathic Society (SOS), a regional group that offers its members a sense of community, since graduating, and regularly attend the quality CPD days on offer, both to improve/refresh my knowledge and skill base, but also to form and maintain relationships with the wider osteopathic community in Scotland. 


I routinely offer guidance and mentorship to my more junior associates,with a flair and passion that I hope gives them the confidence and joy in developing their osteopathic practice. I also encourage them to be a part of the wider osteopathic community, for example by joining local societies and national bodies such as The institute of Osteopathy. by introducing PROMs into the practice so that we are contributing to the development of the profession.  
  
My practice routinely hosts the Edinburgh Osteopaths group, who work collaboratively on a variety of mutual support issues, ranging from the discussion of practice based issues to CPD workshops, some of which feed back to GOsC consultations, for example the ‘early adopter’ initiative.I take an active role in ensuring that these groups continue to grow and to develop a strong sense of community, collaborative working and mutual support. I am also an envoy of osteopathy within the osteopathic and greater health care communities. 


In the few years I have been developing my skills outside of the practice, having involved myself in two exciting initiatives that I hope demonstrate my enthusiasm for and commitment to being a leader in this profession. The first of which was the mentoring pilot. Although I had already been working with my own associates, coaching them and offering tutorials/skill sharing within the practice, I decided I wanted to cast the net wider, and I now mentor new graduates from other practices. Being a part of the pilot highlighted that I too would benefit from some external support, and so I subsequently arranged my own mentors, to help clarify and deliver my personal, business and osteopathic goals. The second initiative was the ODG, OU leadership course, which has raised my awareness of colleagues being resistant to change, and potentially feeling deskilled and devalued by it. With the current changes in the CPD scheme this has been highlighted in local discussions. I am aware that as established autonomous practitioners, we may be resistant to the value of supervision and mentoring, and that the thought of change may leave some fearful. To proceed with new initiatives we need a clear and reassuring dialogue. Therefore, skill, patience and tact are required in introducing these ideas, attributes I feel I can easily offer.

 I run a busy practice in Edinburgh, with five self-employed associates. I have to make day-to-day and more long-term decisions including, supporting colleagues, book keeping,  accounts and payroll, building maintenance, as well as keeping abreast of marketing, social media, to keep the business modern and customer focussed.In the few years I have been developing my skills outside of the practice, having involved myself in two exciting initiatives that I hope demonstrate my enthusiasm for and commitment to being a leader in this profession. The first of which was the mentoring pilot. Although I had already been working with my own associates, coaching them and offering tutorials/skill sharing within the practice, I decided I wanted to cast the net wider, and I now mentor new graduates from other practices. Being a part of the pilot highlighted that I too would benefit from some external support, and so I subsequently arranged my own mentors, to help clarify and deliver my personal, business and osteopathic goals. The second initiative was the ODG, OU leadership course, which has raised my awareness of colleagues being resistant to change, and potentially feeling deskilled and devalued by it. With the current changes in the CPD scheme this has been highlighted in local discussions. I am aware that as established autonomous practitioners, we may be resistant to the value of supervision and mentoring, and that the thought of change may leave some fearful. To proceed with new initiatives we need a clear and reassuring dialogue. Therefore, skill, patience and tact are required in introducing these ideas, attributes I feel I can easily offer.

 I run a successful practice in Edinburgh, with five self-employed associates. I have to make day-to-day and more long-term decisions including, supporting colleagues, book keeping,  accounts and payroll, building maintenance, as well as keeping abreast of marketing, social media, to keep the business modern and customer focussed.
Over the past few years, I have overhauled operations within my practice. Systems were introduced and streamlined in order to create a modern and thriving clinic. I studied marketing, learnt how to harness social media and local collaboration to grow my patient base. Within that, my mission is also to educate my community so that they are empowered to take care of their own health.During this period of change, there was initially some resistance from associates. However, I stood firm in my vision for the practice. I encouraged, explained and inspired the team to pull together to create a greatly improved service for our community.This has now been achieved and we have a happy and cohesive team who are serving many more patients than previously.

Outside of osteopathy, I am involved in a local community group and resident association. Meetings require some preparation, reading previous minutes and relevant information regarding the local area, such as council minutes regarding traffic, refuse collection and street lighting. These meetings can often become heated, and although I do not chair them, I like to think I bring a level head and calm manner on those occasions. I am able to stay focussed during debates of controversial issues, listen to the views of others, and contribute my views with consideration and diplomacy, working towards a place of mutual understanding and respect.

Working so far away from London, I am all too aware of how easy it is for practitioners to become insular in their working practice and isolated from the wider osteopathic community. I would like to inspire the profession to work more collaboratively and encourage greater involvement with the iO, in order that osteopathy take a major role in health care throughout the UK.I believe this is imperative if we are going to stand out as Allied Health Professionals and be increasingly visible to the public.Working within the council would mean I could be part of a team working to inspire the whole profession to work together. I want to urge osteopaths to become more involved with the iO, enabling osteopathy to take a major role in healthcare in the UK.

On reflection, I have been very fortunate to have been supported by many colleagues over the years, and in turn have offered my support to them, as well as to the next generation of osteopaths. For me, the iO has been an important part of this support structure.My vision now, and mission should I be fortunate enough to be given this opportunity with the iO council, is to bring our profession together, encouraging greater collaboration and support between established osteopaths, and greater guidance to newer graduates, so that every osteopath, no matter what their experience, have the support they need throughout their career.

After 21 years in private practice, I now feel that it is the right time for me to look forwards and lend my passion and skillset to the development of our profession. I want to enthusiastically embrace the opportunity of being a member of the iO council and will enjoy working as part of a team. Identifying the key needs within the profession is crucial. The opportunities for the profession’s development that will propel us into the future are important to me. At this point in my career it would be an honour to serve the wider profession as it moves into the forefront of healthcare in the UK.

Over the past few years, I have overhauled operations within my practice. Systems were introduced and streamlined in order to create a modern and thriving clinic. I studied marketing, learnt how to harness social media and local collaboration to grow my patient base. Within that, my mission is also to educate my community so that they are empowered to take care of their own health.During this period of change, there was initially some resistance from associates. However, I stood firm in my vision for the practice. I encouraged, explained and inspired the team to pull together to create a greatly improved service for our community.This has now been achieved and we have a happy and cohesive team who are serving many more patients than previously.

Outside of osteopathy, I am involved in a local community group and resident association. Meetings require some preparation, reading previous minutes and relevant information regarding the local area, such as council minutes regarding traffic, refuse collection and street lighting. These meetings can often become heated, and although I do not chair them, I like to think I bring a level head and calm manner on those occasions. I am able to stay focussed during debates of controversial issues, listen to the views of others, and contribute my views with consideration and diplomacy, working towards a place of mutual understanding and respect.

Working so far away from London, I am all too aware of how easy it is for practitioners to become insular in their working practice and isolated from the wider osteopathic community. I would like to inspire the profession to work more collaboratively and encourage greater involvement with the iO, in order that osteopathy take a major role in health care throughout the UK.I believe this is imperative if we are going to stand out as Allied Health Professionals and be increasingly visible to the public.Working within the council would mean I could be part of a team working to inspire the whole profession to work together. I want to urge osteopaths to become more involved with the iO, enabling osteopathy to take a major role in healthcare in the UK.

On reflection, I have been very fortunate to have been supported by many colleagues over the years, and in turn have offered my support to them, as well as to the next generation of osteopaths. For me, the iO has been an important part of this support structure.My vision now, and mission should I be fortunate enough to be given this opportunity with the iO council, is to bring our profession together, encouraging greater collaboration and support between established osteopaths, and greater guidance to newer graduates, so that every osteopath, no matter what their experience, have the support they need throughout their career.

After 21 years in private practice, I now feel that it is the right time for me to look forwards and lend my passion and skillset to the development of our profession. I want to enthusiastically embrace the opportunity of being a member of the iO council and will enjoy working as part of a team. Identifying the key needs within the profession is crucial. The opportunities for the profession’s development that will propel us into the future are important to me. At this point in my career it would be an honour to serve the wider profession as it moves into the forefront of healthcare in the UK.




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